Do you really use all of those Leica’s

Yup.  

One of the more common questions I get is do I actually use my cameras. Pretty much every time I leave the house I take a camera. For most of my serious shooting I grab my M10. I like the look of the images but they are not that much different than the M 240 images. Actually they are the same. But the M10 is so much thinner that I feel more comfortable carrying it. The M10 feels so much like the M6 and I carried that for about 20 years so it has a familiar feel to it. 

The M240 has been mostly regulated to backup duty but it sees its share of action. The 28mm Summaron is mounted on it and that turns it into a nice little point and shoot camera. The more I shoot with that little pancake lens the more that I like it. Really has a film look to it.  

I have been shooting more and more film so my M6’s get the occasional exercise. Like to shoot tri-x and process it myself. I skip proof sheets and go straight to the scanner. I have shot so much film over the years that I can judge a negative without proofs. The Lightroom presets are nice but I still like the look of real grain. As long as they keep making film I will keep shooting tri-x. I should try to get a hold of the new Ektachrome, that would be a blast from the past. ( Funny, autocorrect doesn’t recognize the word Ektachrome ).  

And now to the poor neglected M8. I never really bonded with this camera. Occasionally I use my M8 as a poor mans Monochrom. I just leave off the IR filter since I’m not shooting for color. The images do print well in black and white on my Epson P800. I see no reason to give up on it so I just keep the batteries charged for the once and a blue moon excursion. 

As if I don’t have enough Leicas I still find myself looking at the CL. Not much reason for one but it would be a great carry all of the time camera. I like my iPhone 8 but I am not crazy about the 28mm field of view for all shots. I really am a 50mm guy. We’ll see.  

Summer is almost over so I will start shooting again. Just don’t like the harsh light of June through September.  

ICONS OF STYLE : A CENTURY OF FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY, 1911-2011

The Getty Museum in Los Angeles currently has on display ICONS OF STYLE : A CENTURY OF FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY, 1911-2011. The Getty has a history of curating some very good photography exhibitions and this one is up to the usual standards. I have not done much fashion work and I don’t follow the trends but I do appreciate good photography when I see it. I have books by Peter Lindbergh, Patrick Demarchelier and Helmut Newton. I went to the show not expecting much but was pleasantly surprised. The work was first rate and from about the 50’s to the present I recognized most of the images. 

I try hard to expose myself to all kinds of photography. I have a niche that I subscribe to for my own work but understand that inspiration comes in many different forms. My abstract work has been influenced by a number of contemporary German artists. Looking at other forms of contemporary art, architecture, and even music can have a great influence on your work if you let it.  

The show runs through October 21, so if your in the area go to the Getty to see the show. Also the Getty is a great place to shoot architecture and people. 

 

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J Paul Getty Museum 

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Icons of Style

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Irving Penn, Nick Knight, Jean-Baptiste Mondino

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Patrick Demarchelier

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Tim Walker

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Chris Von Wangenheim and Francisco Scavullo

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Hiro and William Silano

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Helmut Newton

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Horst P Horst

 Edward Steichen 

Edward Steichen 

NORRHASSEL COLLECTION - IKEA × Hasselblad®

IKEA has teamed up with Hasselblad to make Fine Art Photography available to the masses. The prints are mostly in the 20" X 30" size. They sell for from $20 - $25. I have seen them in the store and the are well done. Supposedly this is a test run to see if original artwork sells in their stores. I would like to see this catch on as it would allow photographers to get their artwork in the hands of a lot of people and make some money. The images were taken with Hasselblad cameras.

 Norrhassel Collection at IKEA

Norrhassel Collection at IKEA

Leica Watch

 Photo Gear

Photo Gear

Leica is getting into the watch business. Today Leica announced that they are entering the watch business. My first reaction was shock and skepticism. I’m an Apple fan and have been following what they have been doing to the watch business with great interest. Apple is just steam rolling the industry with the Apple Watch. I have a long fascination with high-end Swiss watches. Specifically the Rolex. I own a Submariner and I just love it. Something about fine European craftsmanship that I’m attracted too. At the same time I appreciate why the Apple Watch has become so popular. It’s usefullness when combined with an iPhone is impressive. So much so that I recently purchased one for my wife. She loves it and wears it all of the time. 

I can see why Leica is moving in this direction. The company is doing well and selling their products as fast as they can make them but there are only so many people that will by a Leica camera. With watches Leica can enter a market where they can exploit their strengths namely small items made with the utmost in mechanical precision. Looking at the big picture it is a sensible gamble. Most people that buy their cameras would be a logical customer for a Leica Watch. 

The photos of their new watch so a blend of traditional and current design trends. This Watch is obliviously not a product that is being rushed to the market to capture some recent fad. Leica has been around for more than 100 years and is obviously planning for 100 more. I wish them luck.  

Stand for photography printer - Epson P800

I recently replaced my Epson 3880 with the newer Epson P800. Before the printer arrived I started a search for a proper stand. The P800 weighs 43 pounds is a large printer measuring 26.9 x 14.8 x 9.9 inches. An old card table is just not going to be sufficient to support such a large printer. I also wanted drawers for storing paper, ink, and extra supplies. 

 Epson P800 with Seville Classics Cart

Epson P800 with Seville Classics Cart

A google search provided no satisfying results so I next tried Amazon. After a lot of false starts and dead ends I gave up. I wanted a sturdy stand that seemed durable and and was just a bit bigger than the printer. I have gone through lots of printers at home and where I used to work and the thing that always bothered me was when the stand would shake when the printer was doing its business. Also I wanted a stand with wheels so that I could move the printer between workstations when needed. while walking through Wal-Mart I noticed tool chests in the hardware department. Back to Amazon to look at tool chest. No lunch again, so I decided to try Wal-Mart.com. I was just about to give up when I came across what looked like the perfect stand. 

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The stand I settled on is made by a company called Seville Classics. It is a tool chest in their Ultra HD series. The chest measures 28" W x 25" D x 34.5" H and weighs 109 pounds. It is a solid well built piece of hardware. As they some assemble is required. It took about 2 1/2 hours to assemble the cabinet. The model I purchased is the UHD20225B. There are 2 other models that are similar, they just have different door configurations. 

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As you can see the Epson P800 fits perfectly on the top of the stand with plenty of room on the front and the back for extending the printers doors. The sides are metal and I have been using them as a note boards by attaching post-it notes. I have also stuck a magnetic digital thermometer on the side that also shows the humidity for the room. The wheels are large and roof smoothly even on carpet. The bottom corners have rubber bumpers to protect the surroundings when moving the cart. A large grab bar extends across the front of the unit. 

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My Seville Classics printer cart is one nice printer stand that is a great addition to my post processing workflow. It’s not cheap, around $250, but I am very happy that I have it in my studio.  

Leica WLAN Function - Leica M10 WiFi Transfer

When Leica introduced the M10 in January of 2017 most of the updates to the camera were refinements of existing features. One of the new features was designed to address the needs of the Instagram age. With the ability to create or connect to a WiFi network Leica has added the ability to the M10 to transfer and upload images to an iPhone or IPad so the images can be transferred to a social media platform or sent to a recipient while still on location without the need of a computer. The M-APP is a native iPad program and works great.

There is no external WiFi button on the camera to turn on wireless networking. But since the M10 has the ability to make a “Favorites” menu there is no need to dive through all of the menu options. To activate the WiFi press the “Menu” button and scroll through the options to select the “WLAN” function. In the sub-menu switch function to on, in the same sub-menu select connect, and there either “Create WLAN” or “Join WLAN”. The “Create WLAN” is the easiest as this creates a WiFi network for a direct connection to the M10.

Network Set-up

The connection has to be set-up prior to actually creating the network. In the WLAN sub-menu, enter the camera name in SSID/Network Name (if desired). This is done in a keyboard sub-menu, exactly as described on p. 190 of the manual. Enter a network password at Password (if desired). This is also done in a keyboard sub-menu, as described.

Once the Leica M10 is ready to transfer images go to your smart device and select the cameras WiFi network that you have created. Launch the M-APP that can be downloaded from the Apple APP store or from the Google store. In the screen that is presented you will be asked if you wish to connect with the cameras network. Click yes and after a short time the app will connect. As a reminder the password for connecting to the camera WiFi network is easily retrieved, it is stored in the WLAN sub menu under the network name so that you can’t forget the password. 

Once connected to the camera you have 3 options for operating the camera. There is a Live View that enables you to take photos from a tablet or phone. You can browse the images on the camera and transfer them to your device.  And there is a wide range of settings that can be adjusted on the camera. 

Being able to transfer images from the M10 to a smart device is one of the useful features that Leica has added. The app is stable and very responsive. As expected using the WiFi feature does drain the battery faster, so you might want to keep a spare battery handy. 

 The WLAN menu on the Leica M10

The WLAN menu on the Leica M10

 use “Function” to turn the WLAN feature on

use “Function” to turn the WLAN feature on

 creating a network

creating a network

 joining a network  next go to your smart device and select the Leica camera network

joining a network

next go to your smart device and select the Leica camera network

 launching the M-APP

launching the M-APP

 tap to search for the camera

tap to search for the camera

 tap to connect to camera

tap to connect to camera

 live view from the Leica M10 

live view from the Leica M10 

 displaying images on the camera

displaying images on the camera

 customizing the camera and transfer settings

customizing the camera and transfer settings

 tap to disconnect

tap to disconnect